MARISA YOUNG

Professor & Canadian Research Chair in Mental Health

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Marisa Young is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at McMaster University, an Early Career Fellow at the Work-Family Research Network (formally the Sloan Foundation), and a Canadian Research Chair in Mental Health and Work-Life Transitions. Her research investigates the intersection between work, family, and residential contexts to bring a greater understanding to social inequalities in mental health for parents and children. 

RESEARCH AREAS

THE WORK-FAMILY INTERFACE

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THE WORK-FAMILY INTERFACE AND HEALTH

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FAMILIES, COMMUNITY CONTEXT, AND WELL-BEING
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The Family-Friendly Community Resources Project for Better Balance, Health and Well-Being (FFCR) is a multi-year (2017-2021) Canada-wide study designed to better understand how work-family conflict influences quality of life for working Canadians. The project is led by Dr. Marisa Young (PI, McMaster University) and is funded by the Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade, The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), and The Canadian Institutes for Health Research (CIHR).

 

The FFCR research examines the long term health and well-being of Canadian individuals and their families. Work-family conflict (the competing demands parents often face between work and family) is a major contributor to poor quality of life, influencing factors such as mental health, martial instability, work absenteeism, and poor child development. 

 CONTACT 

MARISA YOUNG

Co-Chair of the Canadian Sociological Association Mental Health Research Cluster

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Associate Professor

McMaster University

Department of Sociology

Kenneth Taylor Hall 640

905-525-9140, ext. 23621
myoung@mcmaster.ca

Canadian Research Chair in Mental Health and Work-Life Transitions